Chain Bridge, Budapest

The Széchenyi Chain Bridge is a suspension bridge that spans the River Danube between Buda and Pest, the western and eastern sides of Budapest. It was designed by English engineer William Tierney Clark and was the first permanent bridge across the Danube in Hungary. It opened in 1849. Thanks to Ágnes.

Chain Bridge, Budapest

Chain Bridge, Budapest [rev]

Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge, Istanbul, Turkey

Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge, Istanbul, Turkey

The Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge, also known as the Second Bosphorus Bridge was completed in 1988. It is named after the 15th century Ottoman Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror, who took Constantinople, today Istanbul in 1453 and ended the Byzantine Empire. It carries the European route E80, Asian Highway 1 and Otoyol 2 highways.

Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge, Istanbul, Turkey

Triana Bridge, Seville

Triana Bridge, Seville, Spain

Triana is a neighbourhood and administrative district on the west bank of the Guadalquivir River in Seville. It is connected to Seville by the Isabel II bridge, popularly known as Puente de Triana. It was constructed between 1845 and 1852. In 1976 it was declared a national monument.

Triana Bridge, Seville

Stari Most in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Stari Most in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Stari Most (Old Bridge) is a reconstruction of a 16th century Ottoman bridge in the city of Mostar. It crosses the Neretva river. The Old Bridge stood for 427 years, until it was destroyed on November 9, 1993 by Bosnian Croat forces during the Croat-Bosniak war. After a reconstruction project, it was reopened in 2004. It is one of the countries most recognizable landmarks.  The original bridge was commissioned by Suleiman the Magnificent in 1557 and was 28 meters long and 20 meters high.  In 2005 it was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Pont de pierre, Bordeaux

Pont de pierre, Bordeaux

 

Veronique sent this card showing the Pont de pierre (Stone Bridge) in Bordeaux. Its construction took place from 1819 to 1822 during the Bourbon Restoration. The bridge was actually planned during the First French Empire, under the orders of Napoleon I. It has 17 arches (the same number of letters in the name Napoleon Bonaparte.)